Area residents prove to be a B.I.G. help

Posted 4/18/11

Alana Dylan pulled a black plastic bag along the trail April 16 as she picked up trash at Progress Park in Littleton for her part in the B.I.G. Day …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2022-2023 of $50 or more, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Area residents prove to be a B.I.G. help

Posted

Alana Dylan pulled a black plastic bag along the trail April 16 as she picked up trash at Progress Park in Littleton for her part in the B.I.G. Day event sponsored by the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce.

“I am a runner, I love parks and I was glad to sign up to help with the cleanup to make the parks a little nicer for everyone,” she said. “We checked in this morning, did a sweep of Cornerstone Park and now are picking up stuff there in Progress Park. The weather is great, so it is a good day for us.”

Dylan was among more than 500 volunteers who fanned out to about 30 locations around the area for the B.I.G. Day.

The name means “Be Involved, Give” and was organized as a volunteer service day to provide assistance to organizations and facilities that provide valuable services to the community.

The project reached its goal of signing up at least 500 volunteers, which meant, in one day, the individuals would provide at least 2,250 volunteer hours in support of local programs and projects.

The opportunities were varied as were the locations. For example, there was a tree-planting project at the South Suburban Park trail head, the chance to assist with Meals on Wheels deliveries, doing spring cleanup at the botanical gardens at Chatfield Reservoir and helping fix up the office at the Alternatives Pregnancy Center.

Dylan said it was fun to be part of the project and added it was great to see so many people volunteer for the projects.

John Crawford stopped to get a cup of coffee after finishing up his volunteer service sorting and packing medical supplies for Project Cure.

“This was an amazing day,” he said. “I had never heard of Project Cure until today. They do amazing work sending medical equipment and supplies to health care projects for the needy all over the world. I felt good that I could help a little and I plan to try to get my wife and kids to join me in coming back as regular volunteers.”

A few miles away, Maria Pearson of Inter-Faith said the volunteer help they received was a blessing.

“We had about 50 people sign up to help us staff food-collection points at King Soopers stores in Highlands Ranch, Littleton, Englewood and Centennial,” she said. “It was funny because it almost immediately became competitive with each location trying to collect more food than the other locations.”

When the drives ended about 11 a.m., the food was brought back to Inter-Faith, where additional volunteers including a group from the South Suburban Parks Foundation were on hand to help unload and sort the donations before using them to stock the shelves of the organization’s food bank.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.