‘Eye of the Camera’ brings superb photography to museum

Annual exhibit in Littleton will be on display through March 25

Posted 2/26/18

A large crowd gathered on Feb. 15 at the Littleton Museum to visit the opening reception for the new 2018 “Eye of the Camera” exhibit, an annual event that draws entries from numerous Colorado …

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‘Eye of the Camera’ brings superb photography to museum

Annual exhibit in Littleton will be on display through March 25

Posted

A large crowd gathered on Feb. 15 at the Littleton Museum to visit the opening reception for the new 2018 “Eye of the Camera” exhibit, an annual event that draws entries from numerous Colorado photographers who work with color and black-and-white prints. It runs through March 25.

Juror Gary Reed, general manager of Reed Art and Imaging and fine art photographer and teacher, was this year’s juror. He selected 58 photographs by 42 artists from entries of 251 images submitted by 92 artists, said Fine Arts Board Chair Denise Weed, as she introduced Reed and named the winners. Reed visited with many of the photographers in the gallery, talking technique and other aspects of the entries.

For the first time, the Fine Arts Board decided to have a theme for the exhibit: “Past Due,” with subtitles: “Abandoned, Out of Season, Forgotten, Late Arrival” ... allowing leeway for numerous interpretations, but it set a tone and provided some entertaining titles — take time to enjoy them when visiting the exhibit.

The popular photography show was initiated by an early Fine Arts Board member, the late Gene Kramer, and has grown stronger since then to include a range of images: from thought-provoking portraits and architectural subjects to abstract patterns that seem to be ready to make a ruckus at times, travel memories and lush natural settings. Technical sophistication abounds.

Reed awarded the Best of Show/Black and White award to J.K. Schnelzer for his “Going to Temple,” which pictures a diminutive, bent, elderly Indian man heading up the steps of an old stone temple, carrying a tiffin that perhaps contains his dinner — or is he delivering it to someone else? A viewer could make up several possible stories. Rich textures and dramatic lighting draw one into the scene. Schnelzer said the photo was taken in northern India, Rajasthan. A look at his website tells us that he exhibits nationally and internationally and is co-owner of Western Exposure and Colorado School of Photography.

The Best of Show/Color was awarded to Karen Kirkpatrick for her appealing “Where are the Oats?” She said it’s a photo of her sister’s horse, with head hanging out of the weathered wooden barn door, checking out its surroundings. Soft evening light makes the color rich and subtle — and invites a passer-by to stop and offer a pat. She also won this award several years ago.

Stroll through the beautifully displayed collection to enjoy a great variety of ways to see the world around us: On the back wall is Bridget Calip’s “Snoqualmie Foggy Railroad Trestle,” winner of First Place/Color — a large, brilliantly hued image, captured in Washington state, that happily announces “Fall!” Orange, red and yellow fallen leaves coat the tracks and invite a hiker to swoosh feet in them. Second Place/Color went to Tony Ortega’s nostalgic “Comanche Drive Inn.”

Coreen Zuniga’s “Secrets of the Past,” which received First Place/Black and White, seems especially filled with stories — from family photos and a pattern of branches, surrounded by an elaborate frame. “Wheels and Gears” by William Wiebeseck won Second Place/Black and White, with its precise lighting and pattern.

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